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The Yoga Diet Rules.

So by now you know that the Yoga Diet isn’t really a diet.  It’s a mash of mindful eating strategies and ancient yogic wisdom.  A smattering of personal experience and a great deal of what I have learned in listening to others about eating, nutrition, weight and how all of these things impact the self.  In previous posts you’ve learned …

A little compassion

It sounds a little silly, but one of the best pieces of advice I ever received was from the Oprah show.  Years ago I watched a show with Elizabeth Gilbert, author of “Eat, Pray Love”, required reading for any divorcing yoga enthusiast.  I’m not really sure what else was said on the show but I’ll never forget one very sage …

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4 reasons to chill out about exercise

I’d like to propose another experiment this month. I suggest that you exercise as if exercise will never ever help you shed another pound again, ever. This may seem like a bold statement for a person who makes a living off of teaching yoga, since yoga is exercise after all…right? Yoga is many things, for millions throughout the history of …

There’s an app for that.

At this stage in my series on weight loss I’d like to address an important aspect of the Yoga Diet.  This is no quick fix.  Indeed, the problem with dieting in general is that it encourages behaviors that can only (should only) be sustained for a very short period of time.  Usually until the weight is lost, or the dieter …

What’s your type?

In the second installment of my series The Yoga Diet we’ll be learning a bit about our eating “type”.  I’ve relied heavily on a book by Michelle May, M.D. called Eat What You Love, Love What You Eat for this month’s blog.   This is a great book that I highly recommend. The Yoga Diet isn’t really a diet.  It’s not about counting calories or cutting …

The Yoga Diet. It begins.

The Yoga Diet? Yep, I said it the dreaded “D” word, but only because I knew it would get your attention.  We love a good diet in this country and are always on the look out for the next best thing.  In 2010 Americans spent $68.7 billion on weight loss including (but not limited to) diet programs, books, meal replacements, bariatric …